25 Ways You Are Biased And You Didn’t Even Realize

All of us are biased in numerous ways. It is inescapable. According to scientists, many of these biases originated to help us understand our world and survive in dangerous environments. In this list, however, we are going to go over only a few of the many biases that psychologists have identified. These are 25 ways your biased and you didn’t even realize.

25

Gambler's Fallacy

Gambler's FallacySource: wikipedia, Image: wikipedia

This is the tendency to believe that future events are affected by past events. For example, you may think that because you flipped heads 5 times in a row you are more likely to flip tales when in reality the odds haven’t changed.

24

Irrational Escalation

Irrational EscalationSource: wikipedia, Image: wikipedia

This is the belief that because you have already invested 1 million you might as well invest more, even if it was a bad decision.

23

Moral Credential Effect

Moral Credential EffectSource: wikipedia, Image: wikipedia

This curious effect describes the influence of a record of non-prejudice in creating subsequent prejudice. For example, if you do something that you consider morally egalitarian then you are more likely to be prejudiced in the future.

22

Omission Bias

Omission BiasSource: wikipedia, Image: wikipedia

You tend to judge harmful actions as worse, or less moral, than harmful omissions.

21

Outcome Bias

Outcome BiasSource: wikipedia, Image: wikipedia

You tend to judge past decisions based on their outcome rather than on the quality of the decision during the time at which it was made.

20

Social Comparison Bias

Social Comparison BiasSource: wikipedia, Image: wikipedia

You tend not to hire people that would compete with your skill set.

19

Rhyme As Reason Effect

Rhyme As Reason EffectSource: wikipedia, Image: wikipedia

You have a tendency to perceive rhyming statements as being more truthful.

18

Reactive Devaluation

Reactive DevaluationSource: wikipedia, Image: wikipedia

You tend to devalue proposals because they originated with an adversary.

17

Reactance

ReactanceSource: wikipedia, Image: wikipedia

This is the urge to do the opposite of what someone asks you to do in order to resist against a perceived attempt to limit your freedom.

16

Negativity Effect

Negativity EffectSource: wikipedia, Image: wikipedia

This is your tendency to attribute the negative behavior of people you don’t like to their character and the positive behavior of people you don’t like to the environment.

15

Information Bias

Information BiasSource: wikipedia, Image: wikipedia

You tend to want as much information as possible before making a decision even if that information is irrelevant to making the decision.

14

Illusion of Control

Illusion of ControlSource: wikipedia, Image: wikipedia

This is your tendency to believe that you have more control over external factors than you really do.

13

IKEA Effect

IKEA EffectSource: wikipedia, Image: wikipedia

People tend to place disproportionally high levels of preference toward objects that they have partially assembled themselves.

12

Hindsight Bias

Hindsight BiasSource: wikipedia, Image: wikipedia

You have a tendency to see past events as being predictable at the time they happened.

11

Functional Fixedness

Functional FixednessSource: wikipedia, Image: wikipedia

We tend to only use objects the way they are traditionally used.

10

False Consensus Effect

False Consensus EffectSource: wikipedia, Image: wikipedia

You tend to overestimate the degree to which people agree with you.

9

Outgroup Homogeneity Bias

Outgroup Homogeneity BiasSource: wikipedia, Image: wikipedia

People tend to see members of their own group as being more varied than members of other groups.

8

Naive Realism

Naive RealismSource: wikipedia, Image: wikipedia

This is our tendency to think that we see reality the way that it really is and that rational people would agree with us. People who don’t are either ignorant or uninformed.

7

Spotlight Effect

Spotlight EffectSource: wikipedia, Image: wikipedia

This is our tendency to overestimate the amount to which other people notice our actions and behaviors.

6

Suggestibility

SuggestibilitySource: wikipedia, Image: wikipedia

We tend to confuse ideas that were suggested to us as actually being events in our memory.

5

Zeigarnik Effect

Zeigarnik EffectSource: wikipedia, Image: wikipedia

You remember uncompleted or interrupted tasks more easily than completed ones.

4

Projection Bias

Projection BiasSource: wikipedia, Image: wikipedia

You tend to assume that others share your emotions, moods, and thoughts.

3

Well Traveled Road Effect

Well Traveled Road EffectSource: wikipedia, Image: wikipedia

You tend to underestimate the time it will take you to get somewhere if you know the route well and overestimate if the route is unfamiliar.

2

Zero Risk Bias

Zero Risk BiasSource: wikipedia, Image: wikipedia

You would rather reduce a small risk to zero rather than reduce a large risk by a significant amount.

1

Bias Blind Spot

Bias Blind SpotSource: wikipedia, Image: wikipedia

You tend to see yourself as less biased than others.



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