25 Super Smart Scientists You’ve Never Heard Of But Should Appreciate

Science helps us make sense of everyday phenomena around us. It allows us to understand what is happening, why it is happening, and how it will affect us. It helps us engineer solutions to problems. Finally, it can also remind us of forces at work on Earth and in the universe way bigger than ourselves.

Science has also given the world some of the most important humans to ever live. From Aristotle to Leonardo da Vinci, Isaac Newton to Nikola Tesla, Charles Darwin to Albert Einstein, legendary people from the world of science have literally changed the world.

However, many scientists have made vast contributions to our society. Unfortunately, for one reason or another, most of us ignore these unsung heroes.

This list of 25 Super Smart Scientists You’ve Never Heard Of But Should Appreciate will help you learn of many scientists we should thank and be grateful for.

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25

John Bardeen

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John Bardeen (1908-1991), US physicist and electrical engineer. Bardeen was the first man to win the Nobel Prize for Physics on two occasions. In 1956 he was awarded the prize for his work on developing the first transistor. In 1972 he was again awarded the prize for his work on superconductivity. He shared the second prize with his co-workers Leon Cooper and John Schrieffer. Their BCS theory showed how quantum theory could give rise to effects that are visible even at macroscopic sizes. Photographed in November 1982.https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/physics/1956/bardeen/biographical/

John Bardeen was an American physicist and electrical engineer. He is known for being the only person to earn a Nobel Prize in Physics twice.

The first time he won the prize was in 1956, with William Shockley and Walter Brattain, for the invention of the transistor. Sixteen years later, in 1972, he shared the same honor, this time with Leon N Cooper and John Robert Schrieffer for a fundamental theory of conventional superconductivity known as the BCS theory.

Bardeen’s developments in superconductivity are widely used in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and medical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

24

Paul Otlet

paul-otlethttps://www.britannica.com/biography/Paul-Otlet

Paul Otlet was a Belgian lawyer and author. He’s regarded by most modern scholars as the father of information science, a field he referred to as “documentation.”

Otlet was “legally to blame” for the adoption in Europe of the standard American 3×5-inch index card, used until recently in most library catalogs around the world, before it was replaced by the emergence of the online public access catalog (OPAC).

23

Karl Landsteiner

Karl_Landsteiner_1930b-cr2https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/medicine/1930/landsteiner/biographical/

Karl Landsteiner was an Austrian biologist. He is famous for inventing the categories of the human body’s different blood groups back in 1900.

With his remarkable achievement, the transfusion of blood became much less dangerous for patients. This incredible medical invention gave him the name of the “father of transfusion medicine.” In 1930, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine.

 

22

Justus von Liebig

695px-Justus_von_Liebig_um_1850_001https://www.britannica.com/biography/Justus-Freiherr-von-Liebig

Justus von Liebig was a German scientist who made significant contributions to agricultural and biological chemistry. He’s considered the founder of organic chemistry.

He is also known as “the father of the fertilizer industry” for his emphasis on nitrogen and trace minerals as essential plant nutrients, as well as his formulation of the law of the minimum. The latter basically describes how plant growth relies on the scarcest nutrient resource, rather than the total amount of resources available.

21

Fritz Haber

Fritz Haberhttps://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/chemistry/1918/haber/biographical/

Fritz Haber was a German chemist awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1918. He invented the Haber-Bosch process, an invention of great importance for the large-scale synthesis of fertilizers and explosives.

To get an idea of how important his invention was, keep in mind that half of the world’s current population food production involves this method for producing nitrogen fertilizers.



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