25 Most Amazing Pirate Ships To Ever Sail The Seas

Posted by , Updated on July 10, 2018

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Today, few pirate ships sail the seven seas, but once upon a time, many amazing pirate ships did, and they left plenty of destruction in their wake. During the Golden Age of Piracy from the 17th and early 18th century, pirates had access to some amazing ships. From sloops to man-of-wars, their massive arsenals were capable of going toe-to-toe with the most powerful nations’ naval fleets. Often, pirates would raid even powerful ships, capture them, fix them up, change their names, and make them their new flagship to increase their power. Ready to find out which ships among them were the most impressive? Here are 25 Most Amazing Pirate Ships To Ever Sail The Seas.

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25

Ranger

charles vaneSource: http://www.denofgeek.com/us/tv/black-sails/252498/black-sails-history-the-real-charles-vane

Charles Vane was an infamous pirate that terrorized French and English ships, pillaging for gold and treasure, torturing sailors for information, and generally taking any ship that was better than his. Each time he took a ship, he named it the Ranger. The first Ranger, however, was a Spanish brig he captured in 1718.

24

Royal Fortune

bart robertsSource: https://www.goldenageofpiracy.org/pirate-ships/royal-fortune.php

Like Vane, Bartholomew Roberts loved to name all his captured ships the same name; in his case, the Royal Fortune. First, in 1720, he renamed a French brigantine the Good Fortune and armed it with 26 cannons before going to the Caribbean. There, he had it repaired and renamed the Royal Fortune. He captured two more ships after that and renamed each the Royal Fortune. The last he captured in West Africa; it eventually sank on February 10, 1722 due to an attack by the British ship HMS Swallow.

23

Rising Sun

pirate shipsSource: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/colonial/america-west-indies/vol30/pp404-424

Captained by William Moody, this pirate ship was originally named the Resolution before it was changed to Rising Sun. It was primarily active in the Caribbean with 36 guns and 150 men aboard. Typically, they burned, stranded, and looted the ships they captured.

22

Speaker

speakerSource: http://pirateshipwrecks.com/pirate-john_bowen

In 1699, Captain George Booth captured a 45-ton Indian slave ship with 50 guns named the Speaker. It was his most precious prize and ended up having a long career as a pirate ship, later under the command of John Bowen. It ran aground in 1701 near the coast of Madagascar.

21

Happy Delivery

happy deliverySource: http://brethrencoast.com/Pirate_Ships.html, https://books.google.com/books?id=FFLVgUvv3OYC&dq=a+general+history+of+the+pyrates&printsec=frontcover&source=web&ots=oU7hMIptUK&sig=Hvn5BxLjsrdgK8HydWLq7Eofa0w#PPA318,M1, http://pirates.hegewisch.net/whoslowther.html

Though a smaller ship, Captain Henry Fowler was able to use it to his advantage and gain several other ships in his command. This ship particularly had a modest 16 cannons and 50 men aboard. Fowler was known, however, for using the tactic of ramming his ships against others while his men invaded.



Photo: Featured Image - (Public Domain), 1. wikimedia commons (Public Domain), 2. WikipediaCommons.com (Public Domain), 3. WikipediaCommons.com (Public Domain), 4. Me, Edward England, Irish Pirate, CC BY-SA 4.0 , 5. Pixabay.com (Public Domain), 6. WikipediaCommons.com (Public Domain), 7. Pixnio.com (Public Domain), 8. WikipediaCommons.com (Public Domain), 9. WikipediaCommons.com (Public Domain), 10. Jose L. Marin, Francis-drake-galleon-southwark-london-uk, CC BY-SA 3.0 , 11. PublicDomainPictures.net (Public Domain), 12. WikipediaCommons.com (Public Domain), 13. WikipediaCommons.com (Public Domain), 14. WikipediaCommons.com (Public Domain), 15. Theodore Scott, Whydah-gold, CC BY 2.0 , 16. WikipediaCommons.com (Public Domain), 17. MaxPixel.net (Public Domain), 18. WikipediaCommons.com (Public Domain), 19. MaxPixel.com (Public Domain), 20. WikipediaCommons.com (Public Domain), 21. MaxPixel.net (Public Domain), 22. Michael W. Kolton, Pirate Ship in harbor, CC BY-SA 3.0 , 23. MaxPixel.net (Public Domain), 24. WikipediaCommons.com (Public Domain), 25. WikipediaCommons.com (Public Domain)

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