25 Incredible Architectural Pieces From The Renaissance

Between the early 15th and early 17th centuries, Renaissance architecture was the most predominant and widely-adopted type of architecture throughout Europe. Renaissance architecture is characterized by the revival of the development of Greek and Roman influence in building styles. It first became popular in Florence, Italy, with renowned architect Filippo Brunelleschi as one of its originators. From Italy, it was carried all the way to other parts of the continent, including Russia, Germany and England. Unlike Baroque, Renaissance Architecture relives the elements of symmetry, geometry, regularity and proportion in ancient roman architecture. Structures built during this era were remarkable for the orderly arrangements of their columns and for their arches and hemispherical domes. Here is a list of 25 incredible architectural pieces from the Renaissance.

20

Filippo Brunelleschi. Ospedale Degli Innocenti. Florence, Central Italy. 1419-1445

Filippo Brunelleschi. Ospedale Degli Innocenti. Florence, Central Italy. 1419-1445www.studyblue.com

Architect Filippo Brunelleschi designed the Ospedale Degli Innocenti synonymous with the genesis of Renaissance architecture. It was the first building in Florence, Central Italy that was built in a Renaissance manner, characterized by its composite columns and windows with classical pediments.

19

Giulio Romano. Palazzo Del Te. Mantua, Italy. 1524-1534

Giulio Romano. Palazzo Del Te. Mantua, Italy. 1524-1534www.redbubble.com

Palazzo Del Te is widely considered as one of the most cultivated and erudite of all Renaissance art patrons. This mannerist villa is like the Villa Farnesina that is close to the city and combines the aspects of palace and villa architecture and function. It involves fresco paintings in its interior rooms and its architecture is filled with complex effects.


18

Juan De Alava and R.G. De Hontanon. Convento De San Esteban. Salamanca, Spain. 1624-1610

Juan De Alava and R.G. De Hontanon. Convento De San Esteban. Salamanca, Spain. 1624-1610contraperiodismomatrix.wordpress.com

Situated at Plaza del Concilio de Trento, Convento De San Esteban is a Dominican monastery that is known for its extraordinarily altar-like façade. It features the stoning of San Esteban as its central motif and its interior has a museum dedicated to the Dominicans.

17

Aleviz Fryazin Noviy. Cathedral of the Archangel. Moscow Kremlin, Russia. 1505-1508

Aleviz Fryazin Noviy. Cathedral of the Archangel. Moscow Kremlin, Russia. 1505-1508commons.wikimedia.org

Commissioned by Ivan the Great, the Cathedral of the Archangel articulates the influence of Italian Renaissance through the Venetian-style shell scallops along its gables and the stonework on its walls. It contains sacred relics of the Orthodox church and played an important role in Russian political history.


16

Leon Battista Alberti. Basilica of Sant’Andrea. Mantua, Lombardy, Italy. 1472-1790

Leon Battista Alberti. Basilica of Sant’Andrea. Mantua, Lombardy, Italy. 1472-1790www.flickr.com

Made of bricks and painted with stucco, the Basilica of Sant’Andrea was constructed in the 15th century and features a western façade. Its design is attributed to the humanist architect Leon Battista Albertim who was the person behind the first Renaissance architectural treatise.

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