The 25 Most Lethal Martial Arts Ever Created

Posted by on March 12, 2012

Since the beginning of time people have always been striving to find the most effective ways to inflict pain on one another. What began with sticks and stones developed into extremely intricate and deadly martial arts. So, in the interest of your own well being, it would seem wise to avoid altercations with any skilled practitioners of the 25 most lethal martial arts ever created.


25

Bokator

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An ancient Cambodian martial art having its origins on the battlefield, its name literally translates to “pounding a lion”. By using a diverse array of strikes and weapons it may not be surprising to know that Bokator has been responsible for numerous deaths.

24

Combato

Although technically it is no longer practiced, Combato was an extremely lethal fighting system used in World War II by the Canadian Armed Forces. First developed by Bill Underwood in 1910, after the war several law enforcement agencies requested him to teach their officers. Bill refused, however, on the grounds that Combato was too violent and thus developed Defendo as a more civilian friendly successor.



23

Jeet Kun Do

Developed by Bruce Lee, this hybrid martial art was his response to the “flowery” techniques used in other systems. Bruce felt that although these stylistic forms certainly had aesthetic appeal, their practical usefulness was nearly zero.

22

Shippalgi

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Practiced by the Korean military for hundreds of years, this martial art is split into three categories – thrust, strike, and slice. Unlike many of its Korean counterparts, however, its focus is much more on practical fighting techniques than artsy philosophies.



21

Capoeira

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Although today it is more of a dance than anything else, this martial art was born in the slave ghettos of Brazil hundreds of years ago. Originally, it was meant to be a technique by which runaway slaves could defend themselves against attackers, but before long its practice came to be outlawed due to its “dangerous nature”. As a result practitioners disguised it as a dance by which it lives on today.