25 Things That You Must Do If You Ever Visit England

Posted by on May 21, 2013

If your travels take you to England, be sure not to miss these sites.


10

Shakespeare’s Hometown

fromuktouswithlove.blogspot.com

Every writer and literature lover in the world is sure to be thrilled to visit Shakespeare’s hometown. The place has surprisingly been well-preserved and will show some of the remnants of the life of the English poet and playwright who has been regarded as the greatest writer in the English language.

9

Warwick Castle

openbuildings.com

Warwick Castle was originally built by William the Conqueror in 1068. It was rebuilt in stone in the 12th century but was originally made of wooden motte-and bailey. It is considered one of the best symbols of 14th century military architecture and was also used as a stronghold in the 17th century. In its previous look it consisted of a mound, which was usually used as a keep or a tower and a bailey with an enclosed courtyard.

8

Lizard Peninsula

www.greentraveller.co.uk

The name “Lizard” according to some researchers is a corruption of the Cornish name “ Lyds Ardh”, which means high court. The name Lizard Peninsula must have come from a Celtic name and was formed during the Iron Age and Roman Period. In the past, it was often called as the “Graveyard of Ships” due to the fact that this place is dangerous to shipping. Historical information claims that the area was previously inhabited with the discovery of burial mounds and stones.

7

Madame Tussaud’s Wax Museum

www.videojug.com

A famous wax museum in London that has branches in different major cities, it was created by wax sculptor Marie Tussaud. It contains the lifelike likenesses of historical and royal figures, film stars, models, sports stars and infamous murderers. Marie Tussaud was able to model famous people like Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Benjamin Franklin during their time. She was even able to model prominent victims in the French Revolution and made wax models of decapitated heads.



6

Tower of London

www.thetimes.co.uk

Also known as Her Majesty’s Royal Palace and Fortress, it is a historical castle located on the North bank of the River Thames in central London. It was founded at the end of 1066 as part of the Norman Conquest of England. It served as a royal residence and contains a complex of several buildings within the two concentric rings of defensive walls. Throughout history it has been besieged several times and has been used as a treasury, menagerie and at the same time an armory.