25 Things That You Must Do If You Ever Visit England

Posted by , Updated on May 18, 2014

If your travels take you to England, be sure not to miss these sites.
25

Roman Baths

roman bathswww.dailymail.co.uk

The Roman Baths give visitors the ability to still see how public bathing was done in the 19th century. Guests can check out the Sacred Spring, the Roman Temple, the Roman Bath House, and the other buildings on its street level however, the bath themselves are located below the modern street level. This area receives around 1 million visitors per year and was featured in the 2005 TV Program “Seven Natural Wonders” as one of the wonders of the Western world.

24

Seven Sister Country Park

seven sisters country parkwww.coolplaces.co.uk

The Seven Sisters are a series of chalk cliffs by the English Channel at South Downs National Park. It has 280 hectares of chalk cliffs and open chalk grassland. Visitors have the option of cycling, canoeing, bird watching and hiking in the area. It is one of Britain’s untouched coastlines and it’s currently being managed by East Sussex County Council.

23

University of Cambridge

university of cambridgehttp://www.svubit.org/

Aside from being the center of public research in the United Kingdom, it is also the second oldest university in the English-Speaking world. Visitors will be able to appreciate the cultural and practical associations that the university portrays. Today, the University of Cambridge is a collegiate university and has a student population of 18,000 with 31 colleges occupying the various locations. The university offers students art centers, sports clubs and other school related amenities.

22

Chinatown in London

chinatown londonlondon-sightseeing.net

At the start of the 20th century at the East End of London, a lot of Chinese immigrants set up their businesses in order to cater to Chinese sailors who were frequently in the docklands. However, due to damage from the WWII Blitz; growing popularity of the Chinese cuisine; and an influx of immigrants from Honk Kong, it led to an increase of Chinese restaurants being opened elsewhere. Today, you can still find London’s finest and most authentic Asian cuisine off of Shaftesbury Avenue.

21

The Eden Project

www.strategyforsustainability.comwww.strategyforsustainability.com

The UK is striving to be a leader in the sustainable growth sector and has proven this goal when they opened the Eden Project. This area is home to numerous social and environmental projects. Visitors of the Eden Project will be able to see creative and stunning gardens as well as different artworks. It is also a place for music events and is the home of valuable plant and conservation research. This is definitely more than just a theme park. It is a place where people can learn with the help of interactive displays and detailed information provided in the 10 hectares of rockeries and gardens.


20

Liverpool Maritime Mercantile City

Liverpool Maritime Mercantile Cityopentravel.com

Visitors can check out the six areas in this historic center and docklands. It tells the story of how the UK developed all throughout the centuries.  This dock holds the story of the mass movement of people, slaves, and immigrants that came from northern Europe to America.  Today, it is a picture of modern dock technology complete with transport systems, port management and the home of significant commercial, civic and public buildings like St. George’s Plateau. However, due to it’s modernization, it has been labeled as an endangered World Heritage Site, one of only two in Europe.

19

Hadrian’s Wall

hadrian's wallwww1.american.edu

This place was once a defensive fortification in Roman Britain. They begun constructing the area in AD 122, during the time of Emperor Hadrian. The region served as a military fortification, a customs post, and levy taxation area. Visitors are still able to see a significant portion of the wall that has been rescued through the efforts of John Clayton during the 19th century.

18

Durham Castle

durham castlewww.dur.ac.u

This castle has been occupied since the 1840′s by the University College, Durham. Today, this place is open to the general public, but only with the help of guided tours since it is still being used as a working building by over a hundred students. This lovely castle sits on top of a hill in the River Wear on Durham’s Peninsula and is opposite the Durham Cathedral. This castle was first built in the 11th century as a way to project King Norman’s power and prestige in the north of England. It is an example of what early bailey and motte castles look like.

17

The Malvern Hills and Commons

malvern hills and commonscommons.wikimedia.org

The Malvern Hills are a range of hills in the English counties of Worcestershire, Herefordshire, and a small area of northern Gloucestershire. This place contains some of the oldest rocks in Britain. Mostly igneous and metamorphic rocks from the late pre-Cambrian known as the Uriconian, which are around 680 million years old! Today, people are be able to enjoy the 3000 acres of the open countryside or climb the highest point at the Worcestershire Beacon and even relax while viewing the wooded slopes.

16

York Minster

york minsterwww.thewhitehorseyork.co.uk

This is considered to be one of the best cathedrals in York, England and is also the largest in Northern Europe. Guests can enjoy the Gothic nave and chapter house. Visitors also love the medieval stained glass and the Five Sisters Window that is over 16 meters (52 ft.) tall. It was constructed as a clear Christian presence during the 14th century. The place also has an attached school and library that was created during the 18th century.

15

Royal Observatory Greenwich

royal observatory greenwichblog.onlineclock.net

This place has played a significant role in the history of navigation and astronomy. It is located on the hill in Greenwich Park, and is overlooking the River Thames. The Royal Observatory has been commissioned by King Charles II for the special purpose of “rectifying the motions of the heavens and the places of the fixed stars and in order to find the desired longitude of places in order to master the art of navigation.” The place is currently being maintained in the UK as a tourist attraction.The two clocks in the area were built by Thomas Tompion and were installed in the principal room of the building.

14

Soho of London

soho of londonwww.jonathanstephens.com

Soho will always be a word connected with live entertainment, sumptuous food and pulsing nightlife. It is the main location for celebrations in London and contains quirky shops. Tourists can go on a walking tour and relax in the Soho Square. It is also a place to locate luxurious hotels and the place to find delicious and cheap snacks as well as fine dining restaurants in London.
Soho of London is likewise a place to check live theatre and performance; the place to see big budget musicals and important plays as well as some smaller stand up acts.

13

Lake District National Park

lake district national parktraveltripjourney.blogspot.com

It is often referred as The Lakes and is located in a mountainous region in the North West England. It is famous due to its amazing lakes, forests and mountains. Visitors will be delighted to know that the place is associated with 19th century poetry and writings of William Wordsworth and the other Lake Poets.The place also has the deepest and longest lakes in England like the Windermere and the Wastwater. The UK is trying to enter it into World Heritage Status in the cultural landscape category.

12

Westminster Abbey

westminster abbeyhome2.btconnect.com

The Westminster Abbey is a large, Gothic Church located in the City of Westminster, London. It is where coronations occur and is also the burial site for the English and later the British monarchs of the Commonwealth realms. According to historical accounts by Sulcard in the 1080, the Abbey was first established in the time of Mellitus, Bishop of London. Up to the present time, the Fishmonger’s company still gives a salmon a year in the area since this was a community act during the early 1970s.

11

The British Museum

the british museumposter.4teachers.org

This place has been created for the purpose of keeping the memory of human history and culture. It contains permanent collections that number to a total of eight million works. It is considered to hold some of the most comprehensive collections from various continents. It started in 1753 and contained mosts of the collections of physician and scientist Sir Hans Sloane. The museum opened its doors to visitors on the 15th of January, 1759.

10

Shakespeare’s Hometown

shakespeare's hometownfromuktouswithlove.blogspot.com

Every writer and literature lover in the world is sure to be thrilled to visit Shakespeare’s hometown. The place has surprisingly been well-preserved and will show some of the remnants of the life of the English poet and playwright who has been regarded as the greatest writer in the English language.

9

Warwick Castle

warwick castleopenbuildings.com

Warwick Castle was originally built by William the Conqueror in 1068. It was rebuilt in stone in the 12th century but was originally made of wooden motte-and bailey. It is considered one of the best symbols of 14th century military architecture and was also used as a stronghold in the 17th century. In its previous look it consisted of a mound, which was usually used as a keep or a tower and a bailey with an enclosed courtyard.

8

Lizard Peninsula

lizard peninsulawww.greentraveller.co.uk

The name “Lizard” according to some researchers is a corruption of the Cornish name “ Lyds Ardh”, which means high court. The name Lizard Peninsula must have come from a Celtic name and was formed during the Iron Age and Roman Period. In the past, it was often called as the “Graveyard of Ships” due to the fact that this place is dangerous to shipping. Historical information claims that the area was previously inhabited with the discovery of burial mounds and stones.

7

Madame Tussaud’s Wax Museum

madame tussauds museum londonwww.videojug.com

A famous wax museum in London that has branches in different major cities, it was created by wax sculptor Marie Tussaud. It contains the lifelike likenesses of historical and royal figures, film stars, models, sports stars and infamous murderers. Marie Tussaud was able to model famous people like Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Benjamin Franklin during their time. She was even able to model prominent victims in the French Revolution and made wax models of decapitated heads.

6

Tower of London

tower of londonwww.thetimes.co.uk

Also known as Her Majesty’s Royal Palace and Fortress, it is a historical castle located on the North bank of the River Thames in central London. It was founded at the end of 1066 as part of the Norman Conquest of England. It served as a royal residence and contains a complex of several buildings within the two concentric rings of defensive walls. Throughout history it has been besieged several times and has been used as a treasury, menagerie and at the same time an armory.

5

Canterbury Cathedral

canterbury cathedralen.wikipedia.org

This place is considered to be the most popular Christian Structure in England. It is the cathedral of the Archbishop of Canterbury, the main leader of the Church of England and considered the symbolic leader of the Anglican Communion.The church was rebuilt from 1070 to 1077 and was made larger. It was then renovated to have a Gothic style in 1174 in order to be able to house pilgrims who are visiting the shrine of Thomas Becket. Thomas Becket was the archbishop who was murdered in the cathedral in the 1170.

4

Going Places Cotsworlds

going places cotsworldwww.britain-magazine.com

The cotswolds is a range of hills in the Southwestern and West-central England. It has a width of 25 miles and is 145 km long. The area is filled with attractive small towns and villages that are built underlying the Cotswold stone. The place is rich in limestone particularly fossilized sea urchins. During the Middle Ages, it was an important route for wool trade which is what made Cotswolds prosperous.

3

Stonehenge

stonehengeamhnetwork.com

This place is considered to be one of the most famous sites in the world. One can feel the dense complex of the Neolithic age and the Bronze Age as one sets foot in this area. Archaeologists believe that this place was created from 3000 BC to 2000 BC. But some are claiming with the use of radiocarbon dating that the first stones were raised from 2400 to 2200 BC. It was added to the UNESCO’s list of World Heritage Sites in 1986 and some studies released in 2008 stated that Stonehenge may have been a burial ground in the past.

2

Jurassic Coast World Heritage Site

Jurassic Coast World Heritage Sitewww.redbubble.com

This is included in the list of World Heritage Sites on the English Channel along the coast of Southern England. In historical records during World War II, some of the sections of the Jurassic Coast became the property of the Ministry of War and were used as a military training ground. Today, however, it has been returned to civilian use.

1

Natural History Museum

national history museum londonhdrcreme.com

It was officially known as the British Museum until 1992. It is the home of life and earth science specimens that range over to over 70 million items.Visitors can see collections related to mineralogy, paleontology,  zoology, and entomology. The best part? There is no admission fee!

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