25 Of The Most Difficult Languages To Learn In The World

Posted by on February 4, 2015

Learning a different language can be fun. Not only is it a mark of distinction among your peers, but it also opens the door to interactions with completely different cultures. With that said, some languages are easier to learn than others. So unless you are a glutton for arduous mental stimuli, we recommend you stay away from these 25 of the most difficult languages to learn in the world. If you have managed to learn any of these languages, we congratulate you!



10

Croatian

angpalayok.blogspot.com

Croatian is the standardized variety of the Serbo-Croatian language and is one of the official languages of the European Union. It is based on the dialect of Eastern Herzegovinian, which is also the basis of many other languages, including Montenegrin, Standard Serbian and Bosnian.

9

Hungarian

en.glossesweb.com

The official language of Hungary, this language is a European Union language that is spoken not just by the communities of Hungary, but also by Slovakia, Ukraine, Serbia and Romania. It belongs to the Uralic language family and has mutually intelligible dialects.

8

Gaelic

milepoint.com

Also known as Scottish Gaelic, this language is a Celtic language that is spoken by the natives of Scotland. It’s a member of the Goidelic branch and was developed out of the Middle Irish Language, just like Manx and Modern Irish.

7

Japanese

zifshinshigure92.blogspot.com

This East Asian language is the national language of Japan and is spoken by more than 125 million people around the world. A member of the Japonic language family, it’s considered among the most difficult languages in the world because of its close relationship to Chinese and because of its complex system of honorifics.



6

Albanian

freelanguage.org

An Indio-European language spoken by the people of Kosovo, Alabania, Bulgaria and the Republic of Macedonia, the Albanian language is a centuries-old language that was first spoken by the old communities of Montenegro, Italy and Greece. It shares lexical isoglosses with other languages such as Germanic, Greek and Balto-Slavic, but its vocabulary is quite unique from other languages.