25 National Flags And Their Meanings

Posted by on January 28, 2013

Originating on battlefields as a means of identification, national flags have come a long way since their bloody conception. Flying in courthouses, classrooms, and fire stations they typically hold symbolic significance for the nation and have complex meanings ingrained into their designs. So go ahead and test yourself on your flag knowledge because these are 25 national flags and their meanings.


25

United Kingdom

Combining the crosses of the patron saints of England, Wales, and Scotland, the Union Jack as it is sometimes called is one of the oldest flags in the world having been around since 1801.

24

Austria

It has been said that when Duke Leopold V. of Austria returned from war his white battledress was soaked with blood. When he took off his belt, however, the cloth underneath was still white. Some will tell you to this day that this is what inspired the red and white stripes. At any rate, this flag is one of the few that are older than the Union Jack as it dates back to the year 1230.



23

Aruba

There is a lot of dispute as to actual meaning of Aruba’s flag. Some say that the four pointed star represents the four main languages of the island, Papiamento, Spanish, English, and Dutch. The light blue is generally said to represent the sea and sky and the meaning of the yellow stripes has been up for debate with some theories proposing it has to do with Aruba’s gold industry while others claim the yellow stands for freedom or abundance.

22

Bangladesh

As you may have noticed, the red circle on the flag is slightly off center. This is so that when the flag is flying on a mast it will appear to be in the middle. The green symbolized the country of Bangladesh with its green geography and youthfulness while the red symbolizes the rising sun and the sacrifices its citizens have made.



21

Ethiopia

As the first African country to receive its independence, Ethiopia is often credited with the establishing green, yellow, and red (sometimes called the Pan African colors) that now symbolize African independence and unity.