25 Most Expensive Cities To Live In

Posted by on December 17, 2012

Before reading through this list, keep in mind that determining the most expensive city in the world is not as objective a task as it may seem. There are a number of factors to account for including exchange rates, price levels, lifestyle, and more. For the purposes of this list and so that me might keep things consistent we decided to focus on the cities that would be most expensive for a foreigner to move to and still maintain their current lifestyle (this is why you see cities like Kinshasa in the rankings). So, according to the factors we considered, these are the 25 most expensive cities to live in.


25

London, United Kingdom

Having been rated as the world’s most expensive city to visit for 24 hours it should come as no surprise that London would be on this list somewhere. What may be surprising to some of you, however, is that there are at least 24 cities even more expensive.

24

Brisbane, Australia

Although it is not Australia’s most expensive city it does arguably have one of the world’s most expensive public transportation systems (trailing only London and Oslo)

23

Canberra, Australia

Moving from one Australian city to another this time we’re in the capital of the land down under. In spite of its elevated cost of living, however, Canberra enjoys the highest standard of life in Australia.

22

Seoul, South Korea

Although currency fluctuations have led to Seoul becoming slightly cheaper in recent years it is still ranking on our list of expensive cities.

21

Copenhagen, Denmark

ccording to a survey conducted several years ago by UBS, employees in Copenhagen had the highest income of any other city in the world. Of course prices are elevated as well. To give you an idea renting a DVD would cost around $8 while a one way tram ticket can be over $3.

20

Sydney, Australia

An important Australian industrial center, purchasing power in Sydney is the second highest in the world second only to Zurich.

19

New York City, United States

It’s the only American city on our list and although a weaker dollar moved the big apple down a few slots average monthly rent is still up there at $2,600 for a two bedroom apartment.

18

Berlin, Germany

With electrical engineering and motor vehicle manufacturing at its core, companies like Siemens call Berlin home. The best way to understand why Berlin is on this list though is to take a look at gas prices. These days they hover somewhere around $7 per gallon.



17

Brussels, Belgium

With electrical engineering and motor vehicle manufacturing at its core, companies like Siemens call Berlin home. The best way to understand why Berlin is on this list though is to take a look at gas prices. These days they hover somewhere around $7 per gallon.

16

Vienna, Austria

With a per capita GDP nearly 180 percent of of the European Union average Vienna has been referred to as having the highest standard of living in the world.

15

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo

As a capital city of 8 million people prices here can be steep and a 2 bedroom apartment can cost expats upwards of $2500.

14

Jerusalem, Israel

Although Jerusalem enjoys a relatively high standard of living it is still one of the poorest in the country and several initiatives have been put in place to attract more tourists and visitors.

13

Stockholm, Sweden

The capital and most populous city in Sweden, Stockholm is headquarters to numerous international companies like Ericcson and Electrolux. Although the economy took a slight beating during the recession the appreciation of the Swedish krona pushed the city back onto our list.

12

Tel Aviv, Israel

Home to numerous high tech start ups Tel Aviv is Israel’s most expensive city and although it can be a bit pricey to live here rent is a little more forgiving than other cities on this list with a three bedroom apartment going for less than $1,500.

11

Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire

Abidjan is the primary port in the country and although political unrest caused the standard of living to drop foreign investment kept the economy afloat.